Archive for February, 2012

February 18, 2012

Bon Iver – AIR Studio Sessions

This video is a must-see for any fan of Bon Iver and worth more than the usual recommendation for all other music lovers.

A recorded album is an experience of close intimacy with a compilation of songs, infinitively repeatable as the same version, put in a storytelling order and mastered to perfection. Seeing a Live performance brings your physically close to the artist – and to hundreds of people with the same feelings for his music.

The rather new trend of recording studio sessions is a great blend of both, giving you something between album and live performance.

Bon Iver‘s latest studio sessions at the AIR Studios in London are a masterpiece. As a collaboration between 4AD and Jagjaguwar, they present five captivating versions of old and new songs. Equipped with two Steinway & Sons grand pianos, Justin Vernon and Sean Carey interpret these tunes in a minimalistically pure, yet classical way.

Vernon’s high-pitched vocals and the characteristic instrumentation generate a thick atmosphere of airlessly floating intensity. Nevertheless, its highlight certainly is a stunning cover of Bonnie Raitt‘s I Can’t Make You Love Me, unfolding itself as the centerpiece at 8:10 minutes. At this point, no one will doubt the weight of Sean Carey’s voice, giving an almost angelic touch to Bon Iver’s unique style.

Take 25 minutes of rest for this one – they are more than worth it.

1. Hinnom, TX
2. Wash.
3. I Can’t Make You Love Me
4. Babys
5. Beth/Rest

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February 3, 2012

Benjamin Damage & Doc Daneeka feat. Abigail Wyles – Halo

Spheric minimal electronic tunes from Benjamin Damage & Doc Daneeka, an English producer duo, born within Modeselektor‘s label 50weapons. Their collaborative long player They! Live  has just been released last week.

Watch their video for Halo with mysterious images within a dark setting (including the symbol for former Eastern German automobiles, a beige Trabant). Their distinct, light and drop-like beats and obscure soundscapes remind you of Modeselektor or Moderat just as much as of Burial and Four Tet. Overall, it achieves an interesting balance between sophisticated, ambient melancholy and dancefloor-ready techno. Abigail Wyles enriches this and two more tracks on the LP with her vocals, providing them with some higher pitches and a distinctively dreamy appeal.

Though Halo it the centerpiece of the album, many of its tracks are much more techno and house-affine, for example Creeper:

If you’re more into their smooth, obcure side and Abigail’s gentle voice, take Battleships as another great song:

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